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Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley

Career Design Coach Academy is a podcast aimed at helping you to design or redesign your career through interviews with people in a variety of career industries and interviews with career experts. Some shows will feature mini-masterclasses of navigating the job search process. We will cover topics such as interviewing, resumes, using social media sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and more to network smarter, personal branding online, creating a strong online presence, topics on entrepreneurship, and so much more!
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Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley
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Aug 9, 2016

Hello there! This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #29. If this is your first time listening, then thank you for tuning in! Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach is to educate and coach you on the strategies and techniques for you to have a successful job search or position yourself for a career advancement.

 

 

Today we are going to discuss why is having a ready elevator pitch going to help me land that job?

Most people associate elevator pitches with people looking to start or grow a business. But there is another important use for them: Self-promotion. If you are looking for a job or hoping to get a promotion, you really need to develop an elevator pitch.

 

What is an Elevator Pitch?

If you aren't familiar with the term, this is a short two or three sentence summary of what you do, what value you have to offer and what your goal is. It is called an elevator pitch because it is rooted in the idea that if you happen to run into a big wig in an elevator, that may be your one and only shot at impressing them.

 

In that scenario, if you do not have your pitch prepared in advance, the odds are poor that you can successfully communicate anything important in the small window of time available. The reality is that you get only one chance to make a good first impression with anyone. In today's fast paced world, you typically need to do so in just a few seconds, whether or not you are on an elevator.

 

Crafting a Good Pitch

A good elevator pitch contains a high density of information in the smallest possible number of words. This is why "It is like Uber for X" is a popular meme: In a mere four words, the statement "It is like Uber" suggests a lot about the intended business model and the expectation that it will be game changing.

 

This idea generalizes. If you can use a metaphor or a comparison to something generally well known, you can convey more information and more nuance. This is why people who are good at effectively resolving a crisis at work are sometimes called "firemen."

 

The Strength of the Weak Tie

Once you have a good elevator pitch, practice it so it sounds natural and start using it with people you meet. Do not save it up for that one big wig in an elevator with you.

 

There are three reasons to do this:

 

 

  • It gives you practice.
  • It gives you feedback so you can further refine your pitch.
  • It puts the word out.

 

 

Putting the word out is the best way to advertise that you are looking for a job in X industry or a promotion to Y position. People you barely know have the best odds of knowing about an open position that you have no other means to find.

 

When you give your elevator pitch to anyone and everyone, it casts the widest possible net. It substantially increases the odds that someone will tell you about a company that needs people to fill the job you want. It also makes it possible for them to tell someone else about you.

 

You may not think that last thing matters, but it can be particularly pertinent if you have a corporate job and are looking for an internal promotion. If you have a good relationship to your boss and you let them know where you want to go next within the company, they are likely in a position to pass your name along behind closed doors when the department is looking for people to fill that spot.

 

Cover Your Bases

Of course, an elevator pitch alone will not get you a job. You also need to have a resume on standby and actively networking online and offline. You need to be prepared to do the other things typically required in the hiring process.

 

Your elevator pitch should not make claims that you cannot back up in some way. You need to have the requisite education and experience to qualify for the job you desire.

 

A good elevator pitch can help you make connections. Many jobs are not ever advertised. Advertising the job requires the organization to take resumes from anyone who is interested and screen a large number of people.

 

An elevator pitch can help uncover the jobs that do not get advertised. It can put your name in front of people who want employees like you. It can also get you job leads that you would otherwise never hear about.

 

In short, it can expand your luck surface area. Although there are no guarantees, the more chances you have to try to connect with the right people, the better your odds of succeeding in making the right connection. You can think of is as being similar to buying more lottery tickets, only better because winning a job is not random chance, but rather engaging in career marketing strategies on a daily basis.

 

There you have it - another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and a full transcript, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode29.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with the one person in your life who you know will benefit from it. Thank you for listening and I’ll catch you next time!

 

Jul 19, 2016

In this episode, you are going to learn more about MyPath101.com that is a web app that allows high school and college students to identify their strengths, manage their online reputations, and land their dream job. Through exploration and completion of assessments, students will complete 3 different paths: Identity and Personal Branding, Social Media Strategy, and Career Marketing (disclaimer: I wrote the Career Marketing Path).

These paths are designed to help a student understand who they are and where they can excel as well as define goals as they move forward to build an impressive online presence. In the Career Marketing path, the student will learn how to market themselves as an ideal applicant through social media and more.

Jul 12, 2016

Today, I’m excited for you to listen to this interview that I did with the Blog Millionaire, Brandon Gaille. From a brain tumor to 1 million monthly blog visitors, Brandon Gaille is a true expert in his field with the statistics to back it up. He is a podcaster at The Blog Millionaire, a consultant, and has an online course called The Blog Millionaire where he lays out a step-by-step process for achieving the same results that clients pay him to achieve. I’m currently taking the course and can honestly say that I’ve learned an incredible amount of information that I’d never considered as a blogger.

I have a full transcript plus links on how you can connect with Brandon at www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode27.

 

Jun 28, 2016

Have you ever wondered about the following when you are job interviewing?

1) How to answer the dreaded question about your current salary or your expected salary?

2) How to negotiate salary after you receive a job offer?

3) Other considerations, such as benefits, to factor when negotiating salary?

4) How to ask for a raise in your current job?

This episode will unpack the answer to each of these questions, plus others. You will not want to miss a single minute of this interview as Josh delivers actionable tips and strategies for you!

Here are the different ways you can get in touch with Josh:

JoshDoody on twitter: https://twitter.com/JoshDoody

The Fearless Salary Negotiation home page: https://fearlesssalarynegotiation.com
 
Josh's personal website: http://www.JoshDoody.com
 
A special offer for Career Design Coach listeners: https://fearlesssalarynegotiation.com/careerdesigncoach
Jun 21, 2016

Hello there! This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #25. If this is your first time listening, then thank you for tuning in! Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach is to educate and coach you on the strategies and techniques for you to have a successful job search or position yourself for a career advancement.

 

Today's podcast is brought to you by audible.com - get a FREE audiobook download and 30-day free trial at www.careerdesigncoach.com/book. You have over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

 

Today, we are going to discuss Ten Tips for Interviews Through Linkedin

Linkedin is fast becoming the most important social media site. Unlike other sites, it is strictly a professional platform. You’ll post one highly professional profile picture and put your best foot forward. Nobody will be able to tag you in unflattering pictures, and this isn’t the place where you share off-color jokes or languish about your relationship woes. Linkedin is all about making a good impression while meeting and networking with key contacts. By effectively utilizing its many features, you will most likely be rewarded with--not just an interview--but an actual job.

 

 

  1. Status Update and Headline

 

Make sure your headline highlights your skills rather than simply stating that you are unemployed. For example: “Experienced Web Developer Seeking New Opportunities” sounds much better than “unemployed.”

 

Your carefully worded status updates are an opportunity to draw attention to your strengths. One great idea for a post is mentioning what you are currently reading. Reading trade journals and other publications relevant to your field is sure to make a strong first impression.

 

  1. Use Keywords

 

By using the right keywords in your bio and various posts, employers looking for people with your skill set will have the ability to find you in a search. If you are the one who contacts them, it will still be important that they see the right terminology used when they scan through your information.

 

  1. Follow Your Target Companies

 

Follow your target companies via their company pages. This should be part of your research on the company. Knowing something about the company will give you an advantage in the interview. Prior to an interview, you should know include the company’s history and recent happenings that you can easily learn from following them on Linkedin.

 

  1. Find an Insider

 

Communicating with someone ahead of time who is in your target position can give you more information about the job description. The actual duties of most jobs are different than what you'll read in the official job description. This knowledge can help you tailor your answers to interview questions. Connecting with a future coworker can often lead to a recommendation. Work as hard to impress this possible gatekeeper as you would if he or she were the hiring manager. Make every contact with a company count.

 

  1. Use Endorsements

 

Make sure you list your skills, using the skills feature on your profile page. By listing your skills, co-workers and friends can quickly endorse you for these skills. Endorsements will increase the strength and overall value of your profile. Some employers have reported that they will factor the number of endorsements that a candidate possesses in certain skills into their hiring decisions.

 

  1. Write Well

 

Writing well in your bio is about more than just punctuation and grammar. The great thing about communicating through writing is that you have more time to think than you would if you were talking to someone face to face. Choose your phraseology carefully. Be concise, and make sure every word packs a punch. Be sure to use keywords and buzzwords that are relevant to your desired industry and job title. Take your time and choose your words carefully. Just like when you wrote your resume, this is the time to wax eloquent. In your summary section, it’s fine and actually preferable to write this in first person to improve the readability. Check out Kirsten Dixson’s LinkedIn bio for a well-written example. I’ll include a link in today’s show notes.

 

  1. Choose the Right Photo

 

Your choice of profile photo is vital to your success on Linkedin. Be sure to smile in the picture and look approachable. Do not take a selfie due to the stigma attached to taking a picture of oneself. Dress for the job you want to have. Be sure the photo is recent. Don’t be that guy or gal that is unrecognizable from social media photos when you actually meet in person.

 

  1. Ask Questions

 

When it comes to reviewing the pages of other employees, leave no stone unturned. Read the comments on different posts. By doing plenty of research, you’ll be well versed in the responsibilities of each position. Using the knowledge you have gained, you will be better equipped to ask intelligent questions during the interview. This may put the interviewer in a position where he or she will be trying to sell you on the position instead of the other way around.

 

 

  1. Participate

 

There are several opportunities on Linkedin to participate. Be active in groups. Post helpful comments and answers in your areas of expertise in these groups. Don’t be only interested in self-promotion. The easiest way to be active is to find ways to help others. Being active in discussions will allow you to showcase your skills to potential employers. Remember what Zig Ziglar always said, ‘You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help enough other people get what they want.’

 

 

  1. Wait a Few Weeks

 

Allow your page to age a little before making your move. By actively participating for a while, it will show that you are actually interested in networking with others in your field. Set up your profile and wait to make your move. Don’t get in a hurry to contact the manager until you’ve first thought things out and found your angle. Doing your homework before you get called in for the actual interview can make the difference in whether or not you land the job. Having a seasoned online presence will give managers and HR people more to research about you.

 

Time to Get Started

 

The best thing about Linkedin is that you will be able to do extensive research and ask questions before you are actually under the gun in a face-to-face interview. The hard work of networking to impress the right people will already be done, and it will be uphill from there. The easy part will be when you walk in and smile and give that hiring manager a firm handshake. Now what are you waiting for? Everyone else is already on Linkedin.

 

There you have it - another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and a full transcript, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode25.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with the one person in your life who you know will benefit from it. Thank you for listening and I’ll catch you next time!

 

 

Jun 14, 2016

How to Tailor Your Resume to a New Career

Nowadays, more and more people are diving into new careers. The Department of Labor estimates that a person will, on average, have between 10 – 14 jobs before the age of 38. If you're venturing into another one of your career lives, I’m going to share with you 10 ways that a career changer can upgrade their resume.

 

Do a Complete Rewrite of Your Resume

  1. For most people applying for a job, they will need to do a few tweaks to their existing resume. But if you are changing careers, you will want to use the editing process to re-examine all of your skills and view them through the lens of your potential career. On your resume, make sure that you show the full range of your skills, from communication to leadership to management. One example could involve a former teacher who now wants to go into finance. They will need to show how their leadership skills and management abilities can fit into a brokerage firm.

 

Use Your Job Description to Create a Summary Paragraph

  1. Career changers should definitely have a profile paragraph, not an objective. The employer wants to know what’s in it for them, not what you want to do. Have a summary paragraph at the beginning of your resume that ties your current skills and former jobs with your potential job's description. Most HR personnel spend, on average, just 6 seconds the first pass on each resume, so ensure that the ways that your skills tie into the job description are the first thing that they see.

 

Know What You Should Leave Out

  1. You obviously have to use your resume to highlight the skills that will make you an asset in this potential job. You do not want to list professional accomplishments from jobs you had more than 10-15 years ago. Make sure your accomplishments showcase the skills that are relevant to this position, such as possible management or budget experience.

 

Use Numbers to Highlight Accomplishments

  1. On your resume, use bullet points to show how you contributed to your employer's growth. Numbers can be a great way to do this. Dollars – saved or generated - are an especially great way to give an HR representative concrete examples of how you have contributed to your employer's bottom line in the past. This can even work if your previous job was in an unrelated field. Numbers are also important because it can be a way for HR representatives to rate you against applicants who have a lot of similar experience in your potential field. By using specific numbers on your resume, it can help managers know exactly what you can do for their company.

 

Put In Identifiable Job Title Descriptions

  1. After your official job titles, add a short, relatable descriptor. This allows HR managers to zero in on your transferable skills. One example could involve a mechanical engineer transitioning into project management. You could put down "Mechanical Engineer (with a considerable emphasis on Project Management)". When you're writing these job title descriptions, make sure that you're not stretching the truth. You should only use this resume writing method if you can do so honestly.

 

Pay Attention to Keywords

  1. Keywords can help your resume rise above your HR manager's electronic filters. For many people who are changing careers, this can be a considerable first hurdle to overcome. But you will want to keep keywords from your last job to a minimum. For example, keywords from software engineering can get your education resume in the electronic version of the wastebasket. Use job aggregator websites like SimplyHired, LinkedIn and Glassdoor to get keywords applicable to your potential job. Find a few postings for your dream job, find keywords that match job descriptions, and plug in the words that best correlate to your previous positions.

 

Try a Mixed Format

  1. Career switchers should use a functional-style resume on the first page and a chronological resume on the second. The functional format focuses the hiring manager's attention on your skills. With this first page, you can get the HR manager to pay attention to your transferable experience without needing to worry about the chronology of your career. When you combine the two formats, you can get HR personnel to look at your skills and job history at the same time.

 

Dropping Names is Okay

  1. Don't save the fact that you have worked well with industry leaders for your interview. Instead, weave these names into your resume to get the attention of HR personnel. You could use bullet points to highlight your work with industry leaders: "Raised over $3 million in donations while working with leaders XYZ." Just make sure the use of these company names are not something that is proprietary or confidential information to the company where you’ve worked or that could get you into potential legal trouble. When you're applying for a job in which you have no experience, it can help that you showcase your work with widely recognized entrepreneurs, leaders and CEOs if it is not a violation of proprietary information or confidential agreements. If you are able to use this information, it can show that you have the support of these luminaries and you can really show how you made a difference in your previous position.

 

Showcase Non-Work Experience

  1. Because you're a career changer, your extra-curricular activities will matter more. Include activities that relate to your desired position, like volunteer activities, internships, and pro-bono consulting that relate to the type of position you are seeking.

 

Look for Connections

  1. Some accomplishments are similar, despite the different management structures that proliferate across industries. On your resume, you will want to highlight aspects of your former position that will have meaning for the hiring manager at your potential job. For example, mentioning that you closed over $5 million in sales while you worked in software sales could also read well on a grant-writing resume.

 

By following these 10 tips, you could have an edge on not only other career changers but other types of applicants as well. Having a resume that goes the extra mile in highlighting your unique transferable skills as well as letting HR managers know what you can add to the position can usually put you at the top of the pile.

 

There you have it - another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and a full transcript, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode24.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with the one person in your life who you know will benefit from it. Thank you for listening and I’ll catch you next time!

 

Jun 7, 2016

 

Hello there! This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #23. If this is your first time listening, then thank you for tuning in! Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach is to educate and coach you on the strategies and techniques for you to have a successful job search or position yourself for a career advancement.

 

Today's podcast is brought to you by audible.com - get a FREE audiobook download and 30-day free trial at www.careerdesigncoach.com/book. You have over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

 

5 Ways Your Personal Brand Can Advance You from Interview to Job

In today's competitive job market, it is not enough to simply craft a stunning cover letter and submit a killer resume. Job candidates - in other words, you - need to have a compelling personal brand to tie it all together.

 

Just what is a "personal brand?" In a nutshell, a personal brand is who you are, served up with a career-related twist.

 

In this post, learn about 5 key ways your personal brand can help you stand out during the interview process and net you that coveted new job!

 

Key #1: Think Like a Brand

At its core, a brand strives for uniqueness. If you think of your favorite soda or smart device, its "brand" is what makes you prefer it over the other options you have.

 

You can apply the same principles to the interviewing process. Why should an employer prefer to hire you over all the other candidates?

 

What to do: Research that company. Find out what its own brand is all about. Read up on its corporate culture, community activism, stance on sustainable business practices. Notice where your values and the company's values intersect. These are the aspects of your personal brand to emphasize in your interview.

 

Key #2: Tell a Good Story

The world thrives on gripping storylines. The news headlines wouldn't make much impact if each was relayed, one after the other, like a stock market ticker tape. Rather, news is retold in the form of stories. Often, people are interviewed to involve a personal interest angle. Pictures are used to help readers visualize events as they occurred. This makes news memorable, sharable and sometimes viral.

 

In the same way, the story of you can be told in any number of ways. You can use bullet points, long form prose, short stories or a combination thereof. But whatever form you choose, make the story itself a good one.

 

What to do: Here again, company research will be key. Read up on the employer's own latest news headlines. Learn about how the company likes to relay its news. Practice crafting your story in a similar format, emphasizing your own relevant "headlines" throughout. This will make you both memorable and eminently hirable!

 

Key #3: Audit (and Edit) Your Online Self

If you polled every single person that uses social media or the internet today (which is pretty much everyone) you would probably be hard pressed to find anyone that doesn't have at least one post or picture they regret. It happens to the best of us.

 

But when you are transitioning from your student days into the professional workforce, this is a great time to do a little personal branding online "cleanup." For instance, you can untag yourself from questionable photos and posts. You can edit your privacy settings to limit what others (such as potential employers) are able to view on your social feeds. You can change your profile picture, email address, personal description and other relevant details that may need some corporate fine-tuning.

 

What to do: Log out of each of your social profiles. Then view them as the public sees them. When you do so, imagine you are a prospective employer that you really want to work for. What would you like to change to ensure you put your best online foot forward?

 

Key #4: Recreate Your Weaknesses

The days when human beings manually read each cover letter and resume are long gone. Today, computers do much of that legwork before your carefully crafted package ever gets in front of a set of human eyes.

 

But there is one thing that never seems to change in the interview process, and that is the question about your greatest weaknesses. "So, what would you say your greatest weaknesses are?" "I work too hard." You can almost visualize how the dialogue is going to go.

 

The problem is, prospective employers don't really want to hear about your weaknesses any more than you want to talk about them. What they want to hear is how you respond to the perception or reality of weaknesses in your career. What do you do to ensure your weakness doesn't bring down a whole team or project? How do you strengthen in those areas? Did you ever get a really bad job review and turn things around so well you ended up getting promoted? This is a big part - an essential part - of your personal brand and what makes you unique.

 

What to do: Think about some weaknesses - either ones you are working on now or ones you have overcome. What do you do? How do you tackle deficiencies of skill or knowledge? Whether you return to school, ask for help, hire a coach, ask for mentoring, build a team.....tell that story well and you might just find yourself getting hired.

 

Key #5: Present Yourself Brand-Face First

There is a great deal of research today highlighting how friendly, smiling people get more and better job offers and more and better raises and promotions. If the personal connection is there, that alone overcomes many other potential obstacles....and is a great aid in successful salary and benefits negotiations.

 

What to do: People want to work with likable, friendly, fun people. Keep your body language open. Think of your brand like it is at a campaign rally or a meet-and-greet where there is a big "win" - a new job - if all goes well.

 

If the thought of presenting your job candidacy like a "personal brand" is new to you, remember that this is a process. You don't just wake up one morning knowing everything about yourself and what you stand for. But the more you study yourself and think about experiences you've had, the better prepared you will to craft a brand that is authentic, powerful and overwhelmingly hire-able.

 

There you have it - another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and a full transcript, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode23.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with the one person in your life who you know will benefit from it. Thank you for listening and I’ll catch you next time!

 

Jun 6, 2016

Announcement concerning the frequency of the podcast. Career Design Coach Academy will now air once per week on Tuesdays at 7:00 AM ET.

Jun 2, 2016

18 Tips for Facebook Privacy in a Job Search

In today’s Internet-based society, social media is one of the most important aspects of the modern job search. More and more employers are using social media networks like Facebook and Twitter to post jobs, promote current openings and even do research about potential candidates.

 

This means it is more important than ever, especially if you are an active social media user, to make sure your accounts are appropriate for your job search.  Remember, you don’t say something out loud you wouldn’t want on the front page of the local newspaper.  This rings especially true for Facebook. The pictures you posted in college of that pool party you and your buddies had last summer probably aren’t the most flattering to you or your buddies.  It’s a near certainty the fun those pictures represent wasn’t intended to cost you your dream job.  Furthermore, if the pictures you post on Facebook aren’t something you’d want your grandmother to see, the HR Department at your company doesn’t want to see them either.

 

Here are a few other tips for getting your Facebook Profile in job hunting shape

 

  • Avoid any comments that could be interpreted as racist, sexist or discriminatory.

 

  • Remove or untag photos of you that show you in an unfavorable light. Also, carefully manage your album privacy settings.

 

  • Look at your wall or profile page. Remove comments from your friends that seem distasteful.

 

  • Look at the apps on your profile. Does their purpose portray you well?

 

  • Which groups do you hold memberships? If you belong to "It's 5 am, I'm drunk, and on Facebook" or any similar groups, you probably want to leave them.

 

  • Check the locks

 

Before you take any drastic actions with your Facebook profile page, take a quick look at your profile’s privacy settings page. If you have not changed your settings in a long time, you can see they have gotten much more complex. You can set up blanket rules, such as only friends can see your status updates. You will always have the option to make the setting less restrictive. You should always go with less visible and more restrictive settings. That way, you can have peace of mind without worrying who may be seeing what.

 

  • Consolidate your audience

Going beyond basic privacy settings, more informed Facebook users will put their friends into specific groups. It is helpful to make specific groups such as school contacts, personal friends, or professional contacts. Do you have friends that like to post inappropriate comments and pictures on your wall? You can limit their access.

  • The Front Page Newspaper Rule

An ideal standard to live by on social media is “The Front Page Newspaper Rule.” In other words, if you do not want the front page of a newspaper to publish it, you should not post it. Regardless of how substantial your privacy settings are, you do not want to offend an employer with an off-putting photo or an offensive comment.

 

  • The “About” you section

Many Facebook users forget about the “About” section and leave it blank. This section is typically publicly viewable, if you change the settings, so you should take the time to put in your work experience, education, languages, certifications, and more so you future employers can get a picture of who you are beyond a simple resume.

 

  • Be yourself

Do not be scared to be yourself on Facebook! Yes, all of these tips, suggestions, warnings and privacy settings make it seem like you should not step out of line but keep in mind that Facebook is intended to be a fun, social place. Do not fret about having innocent vacation photos on your profile or kind comments throughout your timeline. It is integral that you can balance your professional and personal life so you will be in a much better place.

 

  • Blocking

If you have people from your past, who will not stop pestering you with inappropriate material or may make it difficult to land a job, block them from your Facebook page. Even if you have friends in common, you will not see that person and they will not be notified when they are blocked.

 

  • Approve tags before they appear on your timeline

While you may be extremely cautious about what you decide to post on Facebook, your friends may not be as careful as you. If you are worried that a friend may share an inappropriate photo of you, and you will not be able to catch it in time, alter your settings so you can review all tags before they appear on your timeline. When you are in your privacy settings, click on “Timeline and Tagging”. After, next to “Who can add things to my timeline?” change “Review posts friends tag you in before they appear on your timeline” to enabled.

 

  • Hide your friends’ posts from your timeline

Similarly, if you are concerned about what your friends may be posting on your timeline, you can hide your friends’ posts from your timeline. While under the “Timeline and Tagging” settings, choose “Who can see things on my timeline?” and adjust the settings to “Who can see what others post on your timeline?”

 

  • Search your old Posts

After you have taken all of the many privacy steps to ensure that employers do not see anything you have posted in the past, there are always situations where Facebook posts get leaked anyway. Thus, it is critical you go back through all of your old posts to ensure that nothing embarrassing is still visible.

 

  • See what other people can see

After you verified that all of your Facebook privacy settings are up to date, you will want to have a look at what the public can currently see when they look at your profile. In order to do this function, go to your profile and click “View As” at the lower right-hand corner of your cover photo. You can scroll through your profile and see what anyone who is or is not connected with you on Facebook can view. Are there any posts on here that could poorly affect your employer’s hiring decision? If yes, change the post from “Public” to “Friends”, or even delete the post altogether.

 

  • Change your search settings

By default, anyone who has your phone number or email address can locate your Facebook profile. If you want friends to be able to find you this way, you should keep this setting in place. Otherwise, you will want to go to your privacy settings and view the “Who can Look me Up?” setting. Think about changing your phone and email settings to just your friends or just unclick “Let other search engines link to your timeline.” Keep in mind that employers may still be able to find you; it will just take a little more prodding.

 

  • Timeline and Tagging – the “Only Me” setting

Right before you submit a job application, you may want to quickly change your timeline privacy settings so that only you can view what get tagged or posted to your timeline. The “Only Me” setting ensures that you have the greatest amount of privacy control over your posts. Not only that, if you change a post to “Only Me” you can come back later and make it public or visible to friends only. That way, you do not risk offending the friends who tagged you or shared content to your timeline.

 

  • Avoid Scams

There are a lot of different scams that are trying to take advantage of Facebook users who are trying to whitewash their profile. One of the most recent ones promises to protect your privacy if you copy and paste a “Privacy Alert Notice” in your status. Do not trust third party apps to instantly take care of your privacy concerns because, more often than not, they are completely ineffective. Always go to Snopes.com to check out the validity of such claims.

 

Jun 1, 2016

Transcript

 

Well, hello there! This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #21. If this is your first time listening, then thank you for tuning in! Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach is to educate and coach you on the strategies and techniques for you to have a successful job search or position yourself for a career advancement.

 

Today's podcast is brought to you by audible.com - get a FREE audiobook download and 30-day free trial at www.careerdesigncoach.com/book. You have over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

 

How Do I Use Twitter In a Job Search?

Twitter is useful for so much more than streams of consciousness about what people are eating and cat videos and memes. If you leverage the potential that Twitter provides more making an impression on many different people at once, it can be just as powerful for advancing your career as LinkedIn. The following suggestions are just some simple principles that you can incorporate into your Twitter time that will give you a serious leg up over any competition that isn't seriously investing in social media for their job search.

 

Tip #1: Always follow the right kinds of people and businesses

 

Your number one priority for job-hunting through Twitter should be to identify exactly who and what you need to be following. It can be a bit of a slog at first, but if you focus on quality over quantity, you'll find that the investment in time spent looking for the best profiles to follow can literally pay off in the long run.

 

As a rule of thumb, try to prioritize following the kinds of institutions that you could realistically see yourself working for if all goes well. Twitter's advanced search settings allow you to pinpoint your profile search to profiles registered within a certain geographical range, which can make it easier to lock down companies within an easy commuting distance.

 

Tip #2: Create a steady, continuous traffic flow to your profile at all times

 

If you happen to be on any content publishing platforms, like Wordpress, you can accelerate your traffic by always sharing links to any articles that you've made that are relevant to your field. By sharing your most recent content, and encouraging social media sharing at the same time, you can create a two-way flow of traffic that feeds your influence and expands your network on both platforms at once.

 

Tip #3: Don't be shy about reaching out directly

 

Of all of the strategies for increasing your professional network through social media, this is probably the most powerful and potentially the most challenging as well. Help melt the ice a little bit by interacting with potential mentors or networking contacts through retweets or responses first. Networking is helping others achieve goals by answering questions, providing resources that can help, or putting people in touch with a person or people that can assist them in reaching their objective.

 

Tip #4: Make your professional credentials and achievements visible on Twitter

 

A solid way to get your Twitter profile on the right track to being a professional asset is to think of it as your digital business card. One of the key ways that you can incorporate more professional flair into your Twitter profile is to showcase a link to your portfolio website or blog in the public profile settings.

 

Even if you're not a regular blogger or an artist with a portfolio, you can still benefit from having a link to something that serves as a "hub" for your professional profile.

 

Tip #5: Be a curator first and a creator second, but still a creator

 

Tweeting your own content is a necessary part of making a personal impression on other Twitter users in your field, but more importantly, be sure that you're also sharing high-value links. Generally speaking, you'll get a better rate of engagement if you focus on bring relevant external resources to people's attention, instead of only sharing your own opinions and pictures.

 

It may help to create a small backlog of relevant articles to share. You don't need to be concerned with being the very first person to share a story, leave that to the news outlets; just make sure that you've always got 2 or 3 high-value articles on deck to share with your Twitterverse. You can schedule posts through a third-party website like Hootesuite.com. Hootsuite gives you an extension for your browser called a Hootlet that will allow you to bookmark, schedule, and tweet curated content you find on the web.

 

Tip #6: Stay on the lookout for any job opening announcements

 

It's true that the most valuable job openings will generally be the kind that you have to do some digging for, but companies will still oftentimes post job opportunities directly on their feeds for all to see; this is where being swift and decisive matters the most. To make sure that you're always on top of these emergent job offerings, give yourself an advantage by preemptively following job recruiters and your target companies who may post an announcement for job openings in the future. Even if they're not offering anything at a given point in time, being notified when they do will make all the difference.

 

Tip #7: No wasted steps: make sure that everything you share serves a purpose

 

It can be extremely tempting to post whatever inconsequential thing is on our minds when the day is going slowly, but for your own sake, try resisting the urge to share something that doesn't serve a purpose. To make things easier, you might want to create a Twitter account exclusively for business purposes, apart from your personal account.

 

Tip #8: Stay on top of any breaking news relevant to your professional field

 

The primary thing that Twitter offers all of us is a constant river of breaking news and announcements, and this can be invaluable to refining your job search. You're going to want to make sure that you've always got the most up-to-date knowledge about your industry as a whole, and Twitter can help you get synopses of any conferences or conventions relevant to your interest. Follow the trail of hashtags that lead to any events that you may want to make a guest appearance at to meet your peers in person. Additionally, setting up Google alerts on your industry keywords can be a great strategy for tweeting out the latest news and important information in your field of expertise. Go to www.google.com/alerts to sign up email alerts for these industry specific keywords.

 

Tip #9: Pay special attention to the industry leaders

 

Just about every leader in the industry has a Twitter account, and following them is going to be a direct line of insight into their key initiatives and comments. You have complete freedom to find out as much as you can about the top professionals of interest, so follow them and use what you learn to be even more competitive.

 

Conclusion

 

Ideally, what you're going to want to do is create a network of different professional networking campaigns on different social media websites that can all work together. Once your social media presence gains momentum, you'll find that the opportunities for networking will start coming to you just as much as you search for them.

 

There you have it - another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and a full transcript, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode21.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with the one person in your life who you know will benefit from it. Thank you for listening and I’ll catch you next time!

 

May 31, 2016

Well, hello there! This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #20. If this is your first time listening, then thank you for tuning in! Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach is to educate and coach you on the strategies and techniques for you to have a successful job search or position yourself for a career advancement.

 

Today's podcast is brought to you by audible.com - get a FREE audiobook download and 30-day free trial at www.careerdesigncoach.com/book. You have over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

 

The 11 Biggest Job Search Mistakes You Can Easily Avoid

Today, we are going to discuss some of the biggest job search mistakes you can easily avoid – 11 of them to be exact. You want to be smart in your job search so you can land that dream job, so let's take a look at common errors people make in their job search.

 

  • #1 Develop a strategy for how you will leave your digital footprint on social media. Your strategy will include how you will showcase your thought leadership and expertise in your industry. You need to determine your personal brand to see how you are unique from everyone else who has your same job title. What are your strengths, your team and leadership roles, and so on? A great way to find out your strengths is to take the Gallup Strengthsfinder test at gallupstrengthscenter.com. For as little as $15, you will be able to discover your top 5 strengths and download the bestselling StrengthsFinder 2.0 e-book. If you are positioning to move up or into another industry, think about the kind of content someone in that position shares.

 

  • #2 If you do share on social media, be conservative. "When in doubt, go without," as the old saying goes. If you are not sure if a photo or comment might be too risqué for your social media network or networks, make a conscious decision not to post it. It is always a good idea to err on the side of caution. As they say, when posting something online, it is never truly "gone." Someone can always take a screenshot of your comments whether they be good or bad. You don't want negative comments or outrageous photos to make their way back to your potential and possibly future employer, not only embarrassing you but ruining or damaging your reputation.

 

  • #3 Don't use foul language online. Once again, err on the side of caution when it comes to word choice when making comments online. You may choose to censor yourself somewhat, as you never know who will be reading your posts. Remember that according to the JobVite 2015 Social Recruiting Survey, 65% of employers and recruiters surveyed said that profanity in posts are a big turn-off.

 

  • #4 Be truthful about your work history. Don't ever lie to employers about your work history. If you have a substantial gap on your resumé, be ready to answer for it with a reason as to why you were not working. For example, if you were a full-time parent for a few years after just having a new baby in the family, your potential employer will probably much more sympathetic if you demonstrate that you have been using your time doing something responsible. You want to show your employer that you are hard-working and are doing worthwhile things with your free time.

 

  • #5 Make sure your LinkedIn profile matches the information on your resumé or CV. Please make sure your LinkedIn profile and your resumé or CV match. This should be obvious, but you would be surprised at how many peoples' professional work history on paper may not exactly match what is on their LinkedIn pages. If dates, job titles, degrees, or other important items are contradictory between your resume and what you have on social media profiles, it can hurt you.

 

  • #6 Don't apply to a job that you hate. If your heart is really set on getting a job in sales, don't apply to work in a daycare. You won't enjoy your work, and most of all, you could be missing out on a great opportunity that would further your career in the field that you really love. Don't sell yourself short. According to the Huffington Post, Kaitlyn Walls was fired the day before she was supposed to start a new job over a social media post. The post read, ‘I start my new job today, but I absolutely hate working at day care.’ She followed up by saying, ‘Lol, it’s all good, I just really hate being around a lot of kids.’

 

  • #7 Don't apply to a job for which you don't meet the requirements or qualifications. If the job you are going for requires the ability to code in Java and PHP, you should know those computer languages. If you only know one computer language or perhaps neither, don't bother applying for the job, because you are not qualified. Read the job ad carefully to see if what the job requires are firm qualifications required or just preferences. If your potential employer is willing to train you on various facets of the new job, that is wonderful. However, the reality is that most employers want job seekers to already have a wide variety of skill sets when they walk on the job on Day One.

 

  • #8 Don't apply to a job that is outside of your skill set. If the job you're applying for is for a computer programmer, but you've been working as a line cook for the last five years, consider looking for a job that is more within your skill set, preferably within the food service industry. If you really want to do computer programming, consider looking for jobs that would be good transitions from food service into more technical roles. For example, after working as a line cook, you might like to pursue a front of house role such as becoming a host or hostess so you can work with table reservation software so that you can get more familiar with the technology involved in your industry. Then you can branch out from there, take more computer classes on the side, and moonlight as a coder while you keep your day job until you build a nice enough portfolio where you can demonstrate work products you've developed for private clients.

 

  • #9 Don’t post lots of selfies. The 2015 JobVite Social Recruiter Survey found that 25% of recruiters view selfies in a negative light.

 

  • #10 Be prepared for your interviews. Make sure you have researched a company prior to your interview. There are normally 6 categories of questions interviewers will ask:

Rapport-building questions – redirect on any subject that might be controversial, though. Mainly, they want to see your water cooler personality.

 

Résumé-related questions – they may use this opportunity togain further clarification on any part of your résumé.

 

Qualifications for the job in question – you can expect to be asked how your skills and abilities make you the perfect candidate for the job. Be sure to know the job posting well enough that you already can answer these questions.

 

Behavioral questions – my position on behavioral interviewing questions is to know your achievements like the back of your hand. Why? Because most behavioral interviewing questions are going to center around telling them about a time that you had to do xyz and what was the result. Think of different types of scenarios they could ask—maybe a time when you worked under stress, or a time when you disagreed with your boss and the outcome. Match your achievement stories with this type of scenarios. Why do they ask these questions? To see how you might perform in future tasks based on what you did in the past.

 

Case/Situation questions – case questions might include giving you a current challenge the company is facing and asking you how you would solve it. If you've done the SWOT analysis, you'll be well prepared for these questions.

 

Personality questions – such as, if you could be a tree, what kind of a tree would you be and why? (My former husband was asked this one.) They are usually assessing feet.

 

  • #11 Take your job search seriously. Put in the effort and you will see significant results. Job searching requires action steps each day to see results. You can listen to Episode #9 about the 5 Must-Dos for Your Job Search Schedule. Networking is key and that can happen both online and offline.

 

Whether you are following the same career direction or reinventing yourself for a new direction, make sure you increase your visibility and reach to the people who are integral to your success. Take the time to research, outline your goals, and the steps you need to attain those goals so you can reach new heights.

 

Remember that career management is a ramp and not a ladder where you can stop and rest for a bit. Maintain your network online and offline, keep a journal of achievements for updating your résumé, stay in touch with your recruiter(s), build on-brand results on Google, and check in on how you are progressing towards your ultimate career goal. Always be ready for a change!

 

There you have it - another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and a full transcript, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode20.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with the one person in your life who you know will benefit from it. Thank you for listening and I’ll catch you next time!

 

 

May 26, 2016

In today’s app recommendation Thursday, we are going to crack the New LinkedIn Students App. LinkedIn is the leading social network for business professionals. It’s one of the fastest growing social media sites and provides users with great opportunities for meeting potential employers, employees, partners and more. There is now an app called LinkedIn Students, made especially for students who want to use LinkedIn to help them find a job or internship. This app can also be used by professionals in higher education who want to help their students succeed. Let’s find out how this new app can make LinkedIn more useful for students.

May 25, 2016

Today is Q&A Wednesday and the question reads, ‘Is it still necessary to write a thank you note after an interview?’ So, let’s dive into to the answer! Millions of job interviews occur each year, and applicants fight hard to get the job in each one. Hundreds of applicants literally fight each other for the same job, each one trying outdo the next one. Only the applicant with the best “closing act” will win the job, so every trick and effort makes a difference. Some people still believe in the “thank you” letter as a way of sealing the deal if they didn’t seal it at the end of the interview. The following contains some information on the positives and negatives of the “thank you” note.

May 24, 2016

Today, we are going to discuss 11 Steps To A Recruiter-Friendly Resume. Technology has changed the way companies do business, and that change extends to the hiring process. Thanks to the Internet, a recruiter may have hundreds of applicants to sort through in order to find the optimal candidate. This means they don’t have time to read them all and tease out the details that may make a candidate perfect for a job. It’s up to you to make sure that your submission works for your recruiter and is ready to impress on first glance. In fact, an eye tracking study by Ladders.com found that employers spend only six seconds looking at a resume the first time. Follow these 11 tips to ensure that your document makes an excellent first impression.

May 19, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode number 16. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. I have launched a three episode per week format. On Tuesdays, I will be conducting interviews with career experts, or having a mini training on different job search tools. On Wednesdays, I will be answering an audience question, and on Thursdays, I will give you a tip, tool, or app recommendation to help you in your job search or career transition.

 

The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you need for a successful job search or career change. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today's show, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode16. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher , or Google Play.

 

Today is tip, tool, or app recommendation day. I want to talk to you about a tool that I use called WiseStamp spelled WISESTAMP.com. They have a free version and they have a pro version.

WiseStamp email signature

One of the most important elements in your email responses to employers and recruiters is your email signature. You want to take advantage of this area as it is one of the most important branding tools. It’s your chance to let everyone know your thought leadership and expertise, how to contact you, and where they can learn more about you online.

WiseStamp has a great program and it's been around for many years. You can enter in your signature details such as your name, company name, title, phone number, website, email address, Skype, and much more. You can also upload your headshot or a picture of yourself and then you can add social icons where someone could learn more about you on social media. The social media platforms you list should be places where someone can see your thought leadership and expertise such as your LinkedIn profile.

 

As of April 2016 when I am recording this show, if you upgrade to the pro version, then you're going to get unlimited signatures premium templates, removal of the WiseStamp branding from your signature, you can customize social icons, and more. As of April 2016, the PRO version does cost $48 per year. I use the free version and always have used the free version.

 

WiseStamp is an add-on to your browser's window, such as Firefox and Google Chrome, and it works with supported providers such as Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, AOL, Outlook, Mac mail, iPhone, Thunderbird and more. They offer several social media apps and icons, like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and more. The most important information that I would include on your email signature if you are in a job search or career transition is your name, phone number, email address, desired occupation, and your link to your LinkedIn profile.

 

So there you have it! Another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. Head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode16 to see a picture of my WiseStamp signature block as well as the transcript for today.

 

I love hearing from you. Do me a favor, and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I'll catch you next time.

 

May 18, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode number 15. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. I have launched a three episode per week format that airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. If you have a question you’d like for me to answer, please put ‘Podcast Question’ in the subject line and email it to kristen@careerdesigncoach.com. I will not include your name if I answer your question on this podcast to protect privacy. If you would like a free guide for the Top 10 Winning Strategies that Every Job Seeker Knows, head over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/freechecklist to get your copy.

 

The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you need for a successful job search or career change. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today's show, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode15. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher , or Google Play.

 

How Many Years Should I Include on My Work History for My Resume?

 

Welcome to Q&A Wednesday. Today's question asked how far should I take my resume back in my work history? The answer is typically you want to take your resume back just 10 to 15 years. The reason you want to do that is to show how your work experience is relevant to today's marketplace challenges. Typically, employers and recruiters do not want to read pages of your resume to review work history that no longer relates to today’s workplace challenges. The technology that you might have used 20 years ago is outdated in today's workplace.

 

You can add additional work experience under an area on your resume called ‘Additional Professional Experience’ where you might list the company name and job title. Another reason why resume writers will encourage you only to take your resume back 10 to 15 years is that it is helpful in preventing any type of age discrimination.

 

On that Additional Professional Experience section, I do not date my professional experience. Now, in my example that I’ll have pictured on the show notes page, I worked for a company four different times in my work history. On my resume, I have included the last three times that I have worked with them, but the first time that I worked with them went under Additional Professional Experience because those dates were further than the 10 to 15 year mark I’ve just described (note the experience has been modified to protect privacy).

Additional Professional Experience on Resume

 

Another area where you will not date is in your education block. What matters the most is that you obtained your college degree or advanced degree. The date is not relevant unless you are a new college graduate, you are using the date to explain a gap in your work history, or if the job posting requires it.

 

Exceptions to the 10-15 Year Rule

 

The exception to dating your work experience to just the last 10-15 years is with federal or state job applications as well as some university or college positions. In a federal position, a longer resume is normally required that illustrates your knowledge, skills, and abilities otherwise known as your KSA's. Colleges and universities normally want a CV resume that is going to detail your work experience. For typical private sector positions, however, you will be able to you just take your resume back within those 10 to 15 year period.

 

In your experience/work history, you should place this experience section of your resume after your profile and skills list. You will list your employers, where the position was located such as city and state, employment dates, job titles, descriptions of your tasks, achievements, and skills. Make sure that you are quantifying the impact of what you did in your previous position as you want these types of metrics to separate you from the pile of resumes that the HR, employer, or recruiter is reviewing. So, for example, you could include the number of people you supervise, the amount of the budget that you handle, if you had any profit and loss responsibility, and more. We will talk about crafting your achievements in an upcoming podcast of Career Design Coach Academy. For today's question, generally, it is reasonable to go back 10 to 15 years in your work history. If you have a longer work history than that you can divide your work history into the sections where you have your most recent work experience where you're detailing a lot of information and then that Additional Professional Experience where you're just putting down the name of the company as well as the job title.

 

So there you have it! Another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. Head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode15 for the transcript for today’s show.

I love hearing from you. Do me a favor, and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I'll catch you next time.

 

May 17, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode number 14. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. I have launched a three episode per week format. On Tuesdays, I will be conducting interviews with career experts, or having a mini training on different job search tools. On Wednesdays, I will be answering an audience question, and on Thursdays, I will give you a tip, tool, or app recommendation to help you in your job search or career transition. If you would like a free checklist on the Top 8 Must-Dos for Your Job Application, head over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/application to download it.

 

The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you need for a successful job search or career change. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today's show, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode14. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe at iTunes, Stitcher , or Google Play.

 

Today, let’s look at the top seven resume mistakes. I love the quote that says:

Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again. This time more intelligently. ~Henry Ford

 

My son’s favorite quote by Thomas Edison:

I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.

 

If any of these mistakes are ones you have made, no worries – just correct and move forward.

Top 7 Resume Mistakes

1) (Mistake #1) Unprofessional email addresses. This is a weed out tool. If you list an unprofessional email address when it's so simple to have a free professional email address, your resume may end up in the shredder. As a former executive resume writer, I cannot tell you how many professionals had unprofessional email addresses. This is so important that this is one of the first things I discuss with a client and will help them to set up a professional job search email address. Some examples of unprofessional email addresses I have seen are ShakinMyBooty@, and SexyHotMamaOf3@ and PoohBearLovesMe@.

 

One way to protect your privacy is to create a separate job search email address. You need a job search email address so that you have a dedicated place for all of your job search emails. Try to get your first and last name as the email address. For example, KristenJacoway@yahoo.com. This sounds more professional and you can get a free mail address at Google Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail and more. When you are done with this job search, you no longer have to use this email and it protects your privacy.

 

When you are in a job search, make it a practice to check this email address at least twice daily as responding quickly to an employer is required if you want to get a job. Now, probably one of our biggest challenges seems that some people do not respond quickly to emails. It's imperative to their job search success.  I realize that there are quicker ways to communicate, such as texting, but employers still, by and large, make their initial contacts through an email. Collegerecruiter.com says it's important to respond reasonably quickly to email messages. You should also acknowledge that you received an email message, even if a reply isn't required. If possible, try to respond as soon as possible or within 24 to 48 hours of receiving the email. If you are unsure about your interview availability, then reply immediately to the potential employer and let them know that you received the email and you are excited about the opportunity for an interview. You can tell the employer that you will let them know quickly when you are available for an interview. This tells them that you are professional and conscientious.

 

2) (Mistake #2) Listing confidential information on a resume, such as marital status, disability, Social Security number, number of children and more. I have worked with people who want to make sure that the employer knows that they have a disability, for example. The law, Americans with Disabilities Act, is on your side as you do not have to disclose this information on a resume or cover letter. Your resume is your marketing document and you want to show that you have the requirements the employer is seeking. For example, you have a vision loss and an engineering degree. You are applying for an engineering position where you can do the essential job functions with or without accommodations. Your resume markets the skills you can do for this employer. You do not have to disclose a disability until you have received a conditional job offer. I am planning to have an interview with an expert in the area of employment for people with disabilities in an upcoming podcast, so be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss it!

 

Now, there are times where disclosing your disability can help you in employment through Schedule A Hiring with the federal government. I also plan to interview an expert in this area on an upcoming podcast as well.

 

Another area to avoid is listing certain details that might be confidential on your work history achievements either with a current or former employer. Revealing proprietary information or details that are confidential to that company can have serious and possibly have legal consequences. Employers will not want to hire you if you share confidential information.

 

3) (Mistake #3) "Information overload" - no one wants or has time to read your life history. Stick to what is relevant and help the employer answer how you are the best match for that position, and as we'll discuss later on, when we get into the nuts and bolts of developing a resume, resume writers will tell you that we only take resumes back ten to 15 years and the reason for that is because we want to avoid age discrimination. Also, in today's marketplace, anything past that 10 to 15 years is really no longer relevant. In fact, the reason why I went through so much training when I was trying to re-enter the workforce after being a stay-at-home was because I knew my skills were outdated.

 

One of the things I have always told people, if you have gaps in employment, it's good to take a few courses online, like with Lynda.com we talked about two weeks ago. You can Google and you can find information about technology, software, coding and all kinds of things to take independent study classes. You could add that to your resume in professional training and then you could put in parenthesis the level of expertise you have in that subject area. Be truthful – if you have basic knowledge, then list that your knowledge is basic. Go to the interview and say, ‘I realize that this technical skill was very important to you, as it was in your qualifications so I wanted to jump on it and start learning as much as I could about, it even though I have only got basic understanding of it. I'm anxious to learn more.’ This type of statement shows the employer the motivation and desire to learn and get those skills updated.

 

4) (Mistake #4) Placing your contact information in the header or footer of a word document. I want you to know that you do not want to put your contact information in a header or a footer. Applicant tracking software cannot read it, and you may miss an opportunity. I worked with a client privately, who had his contact information in the header, and was not getting any calls. And he had a great resume! We made this simple change by pulling his contact information out of the header and dropping it into the body of that resume, and he started getting calls for interviews.

 

5) (Mistake #5) Lying or exaggerating on your resume. I found a picture of a cartoon, the employer on one side is asking everything on your resume is true, right? The job seeker's nose has grown just like Pinocchio's. So being untruthful on your resume can cause you to lose your job. Let's look at a couple of examples:

 

Yahoo!'s CEO Scott Thompson was fired after it was found he lied on his resume with a college degree in computer science that he did not earn. His decision ended his term at the company after just four months. Thompson's published Yahoo’s bio was included in the annual report, which they have to claim are truthful. His degree was only in accounting.

 

"The New York Times" reported in 2001, that five days after naming George O'Leary as the new head football coach, that the University of Notre Dame announced that O'Leary had to resign suddenly after admitting to falsifying parts of his academic and athletic background. Bottom line? Lying on your resume isn’t worth the risk!

 

6) (Mistake #6) Now, another big mistake I see is not labeling your saved document as your first and last name, but rather with something ambiguous such as "my future life resume.” You want to make sure that you are making it easy for the employer or the recruiter who is searching for your downloaded resume and make sure it's easy for them to find or they may just go off in search of the next person.

 

7) (Mistake #7) Resumes riddled with mistakes such as grammar, spelling and punctuation can be something that keeps you from getting invited to a job interview, especially if the qualifications include writing and attention to detail. Make sure to proof your work, and have a fresh set of eyes read it for mistakes as well. Now, we all fall into the habit of text language, especially in this age of texting, but never ever, should text language be used in a cover letter. Also, know that emoticons or emojis are not appropriate either.

 

I’ve seen where a person actually forgot to put their name and contact information on the resume. So just like when we were in school, and you had to you put your name on it to get credit, you absolutely have to have your name on the resume to be called back for an interview.

Resume Review

Now, let's look at a before resume I received and look at some resume mistakes. On the resume I’m reviewing, there are four pages and she had listed her physical address. You don't need to have a physical address on there, because, again, you want to protect privacy, and if you are uploading these resumes to job boards, then that can make it easier for somebody to steal your identity. Of course, there are exceptions when an industry or a type of company will require for you to place your physical address.

 

The email address she listed was a work email address. And how do I know that? The words after the @ sign was the name of the company where she worked. She also listed her phone numbers as home and work. You don't want to place any type of work contact information because that looks bad to an employer that is reading the resume because they know that you are doing job searching on company time, if you are allowing emails to be sent to your work email and accepting phone calls about possible job interviews.

 

The resume was a complete data dump; it was four pages long. She took her resume back to work experience in 1986. So that was 30 years ago. Again, people aren't trying to discriminate against you for age discrimination at all, but if someone states they worked at a company in 1970, then you are going to think to yourself, well, gosh, she was probably about 20 years old, maybe 22, when she started to work there. That was 46 years ago and then your brain just automatically says, oh, they must be 66, 68 years old. That's the reason we don't take those dates back that far. Just the last ten to 15 years. Everything else goes into additional professional experience, so that they can see all the experience you have listed.

 

So how long do you think that an employer or a recruiter spends reviewing a resume? Surprisingly, they only look at a resume for 6 seconds the first time that they look at a resume according to the Ladders.com eye tracking study. I want you to understand how this plays out when a recruiter is reviewing a resume. A recruiter or an employer has beside them is a checklist of things that are required, things that are desired and once a person misses so many of those check boxes, they have moved on to the next resume. I have actually watched a recruiter do this and it is very methodically. It's very quick.

 

Their eyes are drawn to the contact information. The next thing is the name of the employer, the dates of employment, the job title, achievements and then education. So formatting is an essential element to getting an employer or recruiter to get the most useful information about who you are as a job candidate. We will talk about formatting in an upcoming podcast.

 

As a side note before we conclude, I’ve gotten several calls about me writing resumes for people. I just want to let you know that I no longer write resumes as my focus is on this podcast and the speaking and training events that I do. There are multiple great resume writing resources out there on the Internet. You want to see that the person writing your resume is credentialed and ask for samples of their work. Credentialed writers have passed multifaceted exams in résumé mechanics, strategy, and formatting to obtain such credentials. Many writers have a specialty industry, such as finance, whereas others are able to write for a variety of different industries.

 

So there you have it! Another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today's show notes, links, and a full transcript, you'll want to go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode14. I love hearing from you. Do me a favor, and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I'll catch you next time.

May 12, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #13. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.  The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you will need for a successful job search or career transition. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today’s show, head on over to www.CareerDesignCoach.com/episode13. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play and give the show a rating and review. For today’s freebie, I have created a Workbook on Achieving Your Goals available at www.careerdesigncoach.com/workbook.

 

Welcome to the tips, apps, and recommendations Thursday. I have a great app I wanted to recommend to you it's called the Pomodoro timer that is spelled POMODORO. Basically, it is based on the Pomodoro technique and can be  either a simple kitchen egg timer or an app at the app store on Apple iTunes.

 

You can use this in order to increase your productivity and who doesn't need a little extra help with increasing with your productivity? Many times, we let emails and returning phone calls dictate how we run our day. The premise behind this is to let you break down tasks into short time intervals call Pomodoro's that allow for short breaks after a 25-minute period. This can train your brain to focus for short periods and actually helps you be more focused because you're improving your mental agility by giving it these short 3 to 5 minute breaks after your Pomodoro timer goes off.

 

After you've had four successful Pomodoro’s, you can take up to a 15 to 30 minute break. I purchased the app instead of a timer because carrying a timer around with me to the places I go would not be helpful to me. Knowing myself, I would forget to pack it.

 

The Pomodoro timer has really helped me with my Freedom Journal that we talked about in Episode 7. When I set out my goals for the day of what I need to focus on in order to get to my big goal that I set out to achieve in that hundred day timeframe is looking at my day and being completely honest with myself on the action steps I can achieve.  Sometimes, my biggest trap is that I think I can accomplish way more than I can because I travel quite a bit and I don’t always factor being tired from traveling so much. When I'm reviewing my day at night in my Freedom Journal, it is helpful to look at how many Pomodoro sprints I completed that day. As I've evaluated that with my Freedom Journal on a daily basis, I am getting better at scheduling out my time to more reasonable days so that I can get these things accomplished. Remember, we all have 14,400 minutes in a day and we are running a marathon, not a sprint. I have to remind myself of this fact quite a bit. My biggest takeaway with The Freedom Journal is that even small steps have gotten me closer to my goal. Many times, I’d be overwhelmed with the goal itself and take no action because of the overwhelm.

 

So, how do you get started with Pomodoro? There are five steps:

 

  1. Choose an action step, objective, or goal to be accomplished.
  2. Set the Pomodoro timer to 25 minutes.
  3. Work on the task until the Pomodoro rings.
  4. Give yourself a checkmark on a piece of paper or let the app give you a check for each successful Pomodoro completed. Remember, you can take a short break for 3-5 minutes after each successful Pomodoro.
  5. For every 4 successfully completed Pomodoro's, you get to take a longer break for up to 15 to 30 minutes.

 

You need to commit that during your Pomodoro time you don't do anything else except for the task at hand: no checking your phone for texts, phone calls, or emails, etc. You don't want to get on social media during that time. Therefore, anything that is a distraction to you needs to be put aside for this 25 minutes unless it's an emergency.

 

Pomodoro has been a great way to help me to focus on the task at hand because I tend to get very distracted and the Pomodoro timer has helped me to make a commitment to myself. Again, I break up the task I need to accomplish into how many Pomodoro's I think it will take to complete that task. I know I can put my phone on silent (so that it will vibrate if the kids or their school calls) that allows me to be super focused during that time. Then, I am rewarded with my 3 to 5 minute break where I can check my email, respond to text, or check on my social media accounts. When I complete 4 Pomodoro’s, I get up to 15 to 30 minutes of time. I normally will get up and make sure that I take a little walk so I'm stretching and getting out of my chair. You could also take a mini-walk during your 3 to 5 minute breaks.

 

There you have it – another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and full transcript go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode13. Don’t forget to download your free goal setting workbook at www.careerdesigncoach.com/workbook.

 

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I’ll catch you next time!

May 11, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #12. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you will need for a successful job search or career transition. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today’s show, head on over to www.CareerDesignCoach.com/episode12. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play and give the show a rating and review. If you would like a free guide on the Top 10 Winning Strategies that Every Successful Job Seeker Knows, go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/freechecklist.

Today is Q&A Wednesday so I’m going to answer a question. The question is, ‘I don’t know the hiring manager’s name. Is it okay for me to put it to ‘Whom it May Concern?’ My question is have you done some research because most likely you should be able to find the name of the person even if it’s not on the job posting. I’m a take this a step further: when you address the letter to ‘Dear personnel director or HR manager,’ ‘To Whom it May Concern’ or ‘Dear Sir or Madame’ instead of that person’s name it shows that you didn’t take time to try to find out the name of the person. I realize it is not always easy to find out that information but normally you should be able to call the company and ask the receptionist who the hiring manager is for the position for which you want to apply. Also, re-read the job posting. Sometimes, the hiring person’s name is hidden at the bottom of the post. So if you’re applying for a job as a sales manager with XYZ company, you could call and just tell them that you wanted to personally address your cover letter to the person in charge of hiring for the sales manager position that was posted at the job board where you saw it listed on such as Indeed.com or SimplyHired.com. You can also use the Internet – that’s a good way to find the people who work for a certain company with hiring authority. Sometimes, you can go to the company’s website and find an email listing. If they provide an email in the posting, but no name, reverse engineer that information with a Google search. For example, my email is kristen@careerdesigncoach.com. If you searched for Kristen and Career Design Coach, you would discover in your Google search that my name is Kristen Jacoway Beasley and could address me by Ms. Beasley in your cover letter. If you found the job posting on LinkedIn, look to the right, top corner of that posting. LinkedIn shows the job poster so you can address your cover letter to the job poster on LinkedIn. Leverage those connections we’ve discussed. Go back to Episode 5 on How to Find Good Networking Contacts on LinkedIn to develop that networking list at companies where you’d like to work. Run an advanced search on LinkedIn to see if you have any connections who currently work at this company where you want to apply. For example, type in ‘Microsoft’ in the search bar and then select ‘people who work at Microsoft’ to get a list. You will be able to identify people in your connections and then you can email that person, expressing interest in that job, and ask if he or she can direct you to the right person. Now, if this works, make sure that you not only submit your application through the appropriate channels, but also to this networking connection as well. Advanced search for connections at a company on LinkedIn If you can’t find the name in the worst-case scenario, then I would recommend that you avoid riding dear Sir or Madame. You could start the letter with an identifier such as the job number and position title. Then, begin your letter by addressing it ‘Dear Hiring Manager’ or ‘HR Partner’ with the name of the department where the position is located and then the name of the position. For example, Dear Hiring Manager for the position of Sales Manager.’ Another question I get asked: What if the person has a non-gender specific name? In this case, just use the first and last name in your opening address. You can also go to LinkedIn because many people include a photo with their profile. Simply search the person’s name and company with LinkedIn. You may potentially find person’s photograph to know whether or not you would need to address them with Mr. or Ms. There you have it – another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and full transcript go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode12. I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I’ll catch you next time!

May 10, 2016

Well, hello there. This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode Number 11. If this is your first time listening then thanks for tuning in. Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7 a.m. Eastern Standard Time. The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you will need for a successful job search or career transition. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today's show head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode11. If you like what you hear you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play and give the show a rating and review. If you would like to download a free checklist on the Top 8 Must-Dos for your Job Application head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/application.

Guys, I want to thank you so much for your ratings and your reviews. I read every one of them and thanks also for sharing this podcast. I found out today, and I'm recording this in advance, that the show is in five different categories on Apple iTunes New and Noteworthy. It's in the General category, Business, Careers, Technology, and Education. So, I'm just so thrilled, and I do want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for making this a reality.

For today's show, we're going to dive deep into looking at why social media has become such a huge part of your job search process. So, we all know that we used to do job search by classified ads and word of mouth. You can still do some classified ads, of course, but not many people pay as much attention to the classified ads as they did probably 20-30 years ago. In the mid-1990s, job boards starting popping up on the internet. We saw job boards through AOL and then we started seeing places like Careerbuilder.com and Monster.com appearing. And this worked well for people up until the recession hit.

Are Job Boards Dead?

Social media has taken the forefront for your job search. What I'd like to explain is that job boards aren't necessarily dead. There are other ways that you are going to want to use a job board in the future. We know that 3 billion plus households are connected to the internet. That means we're all connected now. You need to use that in your job search. You don't just need to just know your neighbors, your community members and your family for networking. You need to go out there and bridge those relationships online, as well.

So, let's look at this: For every corporate job posting recruiters and employers are receiving 250 resumes. That's a lot of resumes for every job that's posted. As you can imagine, most companies mid and large-sized who are receiving this much for job posting are using computers with applicant tracking software or resume scanning software to filter out what they are actually going to sit down and read with a human eye, because there's no way they can go through 250 resumes for every job that they post.

Right now, the good news, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics in April 2016, the unemployment rate is at 5%. That number has gone down since the recession. However, 38% of companies have positions they cannot fill. Now, why do you think that 38% of companies have positions that they can't fill? Well, there's a skill gap between job seekers and open positions. CNN Money reported on this dilemma in August 2015 titled, "America's Persistent Problem: Unskilled Workers." LinkedIn has recently acquired a platform that can help bridge this gap called Lynda.com and that's actually spelled L-Y-N-D-A.com, which is an online training platform where you can update your skills. Lynda.com could be a big help in people closing those gaps for positions where there might be a skill or two where they might need to get more training.

So, are job boards dead? No. However, the typical hit rate is only 1% to 2%. So, what does that mean? It means that for every 100 positions for which you might apply, you can expect to receive a response good, bad, or indifferent from only one or two hiring companies. The typical job posting receives 120 applications in just one week. When I talked about that 250 resumes for every job opening remember that's mid to large-sized companies like Wells Fargo, Apple.com, or Google. This is typical job posting. However, of the lifetime of that job posting an average of 250 applications are received from the time a job is posted until the vacancy is filled. But this is what's interesting. Your chances of getting a job on a job board is only 0.4%. So that's zero point four percent. Now why is that? Well, HR doesn't want to have to go through all these cold resumes that are sitting on their desk. They want to go to somebody that they know and trust for that candidate for that position. Therefore, networking like we discussed in Episode #5 is critical for getting your foot into the door.

How Many Jobs that are Posted on Job Boards are Filled by a Job Board?

Did you know that only 15% of positions that are posted on job boards are actually filled by a job board? So, what would those positions be? Well, they're called in-demand jobs. Fortune.com reported in January 2016 that the following jobs are the most in demand right now: Engineering, finance and accounting, information technology, manufacturing and logistics, and office and administration. Quoting this article it says, "According to Jim Link, the company's chief human resources officer, the employers are interested in hiring folks who have a wider skill set. What we see is an increasing demand for people to have some type of advanced skill and that advanced skill is falling more and more into STEM, which is Science, Technology, Engineering and Math related areas. These skills, Link explains, would be in addition to those that a job applicant would naturally have for a given position."

So, these types of in-demand positions mean that a job board like Monster.com or Career Builder will be helpful to a person in finding a job. If you have that high-end demand skill set it will be easy for you to find the job through a job board. In fact, I knew somebody who was a registered nurse and this person decided that she didn't want to do medical-surgical nursing anymore and wanted to go into emergency room nursing. She was able to find another job through job board within two weeks. Therefore, the strategy of applying on job boards does work for certain people.

What is a Vertical Job Board?

Now one of the things I love to talk about is what we call vertical job boards. It is a place where it actually culls from 55,000 plus different job boards that exist. I bet you didn't realize that there were that many job boards. Now when you go into one of these sites like Indeed.com, Simplyhired.com, or Jobster.com you may see a job posting and when you click on it you may be redirected to where it actually resides like on Monster.com or Theladders.com, but it is there all in one place on that vertical job board. You could do a search for quality assurance and be able to come up with several different job possibilities. You can also set up email autoresponders. That is something that I really encourage that you explore because it just makes it so much easier. To set up email autoresponders on job boards you can type in some of the titles of jobs that you are interested in and put the location where you want to work, the name of the company, or numerous other filters. Then the site will actually email you when a job matches your preferences.

Top 3 Social Media Sites that Employers and Recruiters are Using

According to a Jobvite survey these are the top 3 sites that employers are currently using to do their job recruiting. Ninety-four percent of recruiters use LinkedIn, 66% of recruiters use Facebook and 52% of recruiters use Twitter. Now, I've been following Jobvite study for several years. These sites have steadily risen on those three platforms. So, it's not a trend and it's not something that is slowly dying off. It is something that makes good sense to employers and recruiters. It is much cheaper for them to post jobs and identify candidates and passive candidates on social media than it is for them to post jobs. Employers and recruiters also report that they find better quality leads through social media platforms.

How Do Recruiters Use Social Media?

So, how are recruiters using social media? Well, let's look at LinkedIn first. Ninety-three percent use LinkedIn to vet candidates pre-interview, 95% use it to actually contact candidates, 95% of it use to search for candidates, 93% of them use it to keep tabs on potential candidates, and 92% use LinkedIn to post. Now shifting to Facebook, 32% use Facebook to vet candidates pre-interview, 51% use Facebook to generate employee referrals, 59% use Facebook to showcase employer brands, 48% use Facebook to post jobs, and 35% use Facebook to vet candidates post-interview. Now we'll look at Twitter. Seventeen percent are using Twitter to search for candidates, 44% report that they use Twitter to showcase employer brand, 39% of recruiters are using Twitter to post jobs, and 18% use Twitter to vet candidates post-interview.

What Are Employers and Recruiters Looking For When They Google a Potential Job Candidate?

So, what are employers and recruiters actually looking for when they go and look at a profile of a candidate on social networking? Well, 97% of them are looking at professional experience, 96% are reviewing the length of professional tenure, 88% are checking out industry related posts that they might be posting on social media, 93% are checking to see if there is a mutual connection. So, is there someone they know that you also know because that can increase the know, like, and trust factor.  95% are looking at specific hard skills, 80% are looking to see if a candidate is a good cultural fit, 83% are reviewing your examples of written and design work.

You want to know what your online presence says about you. For more tips about your online presence, go back and check out Episode 3 called, "How Digital Dirt Can Affect Your Job Search and 5 Strategies To Improve Your Online Reputation." The question I get asked quite a bit when I do different speeches around the country is, "Is it legal for an employer or recruiter to look at this information?" And the answer is yes as long as the information is not used to discriminate against a protected class. Most people don't have privacy controls setup. What's out there on Google about you is fair game, so you will want to do an audit of your online presence.

The American Bar actually published something where they talked about how 53% of resumes and job applications contain false information. Seventy-eight percent of resumes and job applications are misleading. It is helpful for an employer or recruiter to be able to look at a resume and then check-out what you are saying about yourself online. They're looking to see do those two things add up and that's very important because if they don't add up then you need to make sure that they do.

There is a true story about George O'Leary who was hired as the Notre Dame football coach and he had to resign five days after being hired in 2001, due to falsifying his academic and athletic credentials. He exaggerated his accomplishments as a football player and falsely claimed to have earned a master's degree in education from NYU.

Yahoo CEO, Scott Thompson, was fired because his resume he lied about the details of his college degree. The resume claimed he had held a bachelor's degree in both accounting and computer science from Stonehill College, while in actuality his degree is only in accounting. Social media has provided an easy way for employers and recruiters to find out more about job candidates and it also gives them a cheaper alternative of posting their jobs. It is a trend that continues to rise.

So, there you have it. Another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today's show notes, links, and full transcript go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/episode11. I love hearing from you. Do me a favor and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I'll catch you next time.

May 5, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode number 10 - we are in double digits now! If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. I have launched a three episode per week format. On Tuesdays, I will be conducting interviews with career experts, or having a mini training on different job search tools. On Wednesdays, I will be answering an audience question, and on Thursdays, I will give you a tip, tool, or app recommendation to help you in your job search or career transition. If you would like a free guide on 'The Top 10 Winning Strategies that Every Successful Job Seeker Knows' at www.careerdesigncoach.com/freechecklist.

 

The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you need for a successful job search or career change. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today's show, head on over to www.careerdesigncoach.com/10-2. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher , or Google Play. 

 

Today, I'm going to talk to you about an app that I would recommend to you. It's called Interview Buzz. Interview Buzz has a light version and a pro version. In the light version, which is a free version, you're going to get more than 50 frequently asked questions along with the answers, organized in topic sessions, and some dos and don'ts for interviews, as well as practice interview questions, etcetera. In the pro version, you're going to get 300+ different questions for the interview.

 

The Interview Buzz pro version is only $0.99 in the Apple iTunes store. I downloaded the app so that I could look at it with you, because this is something that has been recommended in different articles that I have read, and after reviewing it myself, I would say that it is an excellent app in order to prepare you for your interview.

 

Let's look at one of the questions that it asks. It talks about frequent job changes. So the question might be, "You have changed jobs frequently, do you plan to stay with us for a long time?" Or, "How do you explain these frequent changes in your job?" The app then gives you the following information: "You have to convince the organization that you would be staying at this job. You should describe situations why you changed jobs, such as you switched to a different area of work, you had to change locations due to family reasons, you were out of college, so the first job did not meet your expectations. Perhaps you were offered a better job, or a higher position at another place, so that just shows you're competitive."

 

I can relate to this with my own work history, because I told you in the very first episode, where I introduced myself to you, that because my former husband moved around some with his position, I ended up with 10 jobs by the time I was 38. According to the Department of Labor, on average, before a person turns 38, they're going to have about 10 different jobs. It is something that, if I were to go on an interview today, I would probably have to explain.

 

Now, there are some other features of this app that I wanted to go over with you. They have some dos and don'ts. For example, one of the dos deals with the interview location. The do is to get to know the location of the interview. You want to find out how long it takes to get there, where to park and then you want to go inside to find a restroom if you want to freshen up. That's always helpful to know where the company is located before you have your interview date.

 

I will tell you that I am one of those people that just drive my husband up the wall, because I show up to places on time, or just maybe a minute or two late. He, on the other hand, shows up with 15 minutes of margin. I've really had to work on training myself on how to show up places with 15 minutes of margin. I'm doing so much better now.

 

For an interview, you always want to show up at least 15 minutes early. Now, don't show up super early, because it can make the employer or recruiter uncomfortable, or nervous, because you're sitting in the lobby waiting for them. You want to be there within a reasonable amount of time, but not super early.

 

They have attire tips, so things for you to wear on your interview. They have dining etiquette. So if you have a lunch interview, you'll have a little bit of an etiquette tutorial before you go. And there's also a fun one on how to tie either a Windsor knot tie, or a half Windsor knot tie, which is something I probably need to go over with my 15-year-old son!

 

They have places for you to come back, and edit these answers, so you can write up how you're personally going to respond to these questions to rehearse prior to the interview. The app has lots of different topics, such as the questions that would be based on your qualifications, skills, and careers, your personal motivations and personality, your goals and strategy, your job performance, how you've been in a team player, handling stress, and more.

 

The handling stress question is always a favorite question that I hear when I sit on interview panels. The question might be dealing with pressure, like, "How well do you handle pressure?" The app tells you that this is particularly important for management, financial companies, etcetera. Your answer is where you want to be able to share an achievement story. We're going to talk about that in some upcoming episodes about writing your achievements for your resume, and how do you draw out those achievement stories, because, oh my goodness, that's going to be so important for you when you go into an interview. You have got to know your achievement stories well and how it might relate to one of these behavioral type interview questions.

You want to prepare a story of an instance that could somehow relate to a current interview where you handled pressure, and deadline successfully. If you deal with pressure daily at your job, then you're going to want to discuss how you deal with it on a regular basis.

 

Interview Buzz is an awesome app, I really like it. It's got a ton of great questions. I think you're good to go with the light version, which is your free version. Or, if you want to upgrade for just $0.99, you can upgrade to that pro version.

 

So there you have it! Another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today's show notes, links, and a full transcript, you'll want to go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/10-2. I love hearing from you. Do me a favor, and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I'll catch you next time.

May 4, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #9. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you will need for a successful job search or career transition. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today?s show, head on over to www.CareerDesignCoach.com/9. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play. / / / Today?s question: Since losing my job, I am struggling to figure out priorities on what to do in my job search. What are some things I can do to move forward? / / / I believe so strongly that part of the reason many people struggle in the structure of the daily goals of a job search is that they get out of routines and schedules. Having routines/schedules is instrumental in this process. You need to map out clear goals required to get you landed in your next job. I talked about ?The Freedom Journal? in episode #7, so check out that short podcast for this actionable resource. / / / Different perspectives of what has happened in your past yield different outcomes. Your past does not have to dictate your future. If you are in a job search due to circumstances out of your control, such as a lay-off, termination, etc. take the time to do some introspective work of what happened and the lessons you learned. / / / I recently listened to an audiobook by Peter J. Voogd titled, ?Six Months to Six Figures? and he concluded his book with a fascinating story of perspective and decision-making. I?ll summarize the story here: / / / A single father was raising two boys. The father was struggling to make ends meet and in the heat of the moment to have enough money; the father made a regrettable decision. Late one evening, the father went to a local convenience store and robbed the store. In the process of the robbery, the store clerk and a mother of three got shot. The father got life in prison. Both boys went to separate foster homes and had now lost both of their parents. / / / Fifteen years later, one boy had become hugely successful and was living the American dream. The other boy had been in and out of jail and addicted to drugs. A journalist who had followed the original story caught up with the boys and wanted to know how did their life end up the way it did. Each man answered the question the same: ?With a father like mine, how else would my life turn out?? / / / You have to decide how you are going to respond and make the concerted effort to do things differently. / / Let's look at five things you can do each day to advance your job search: / / Develop a target list of employers for whom you would like to work and research those companies. For a deeper dive training, listen to Episode 1: How to Develop a Target Company Prospect List. Set up a Google alert on the companies so you will be up-to-date on the latest business news should you be invited for an interview. Place ten businesses in a Tier A list, ten companies in a Tier B list and the rest in a Tier C list. If you are struggling to figure out at least 20 companies, check out Hoovers.com to check out a target companies top 3 competitors (example pictured below of Apple's top 3 competitors who are Hewlett-Packard, Google Inc., and Blackberry Limited. Find out company needs through online job boards, like Indeed.com. You can search for the companies where you want to work and see all of there job listings on a site, like Indeed.com. Indeed.com is a vertical job board that means it culls other job boards to pull it in one place. / / / Take advantage of graph search features available on Facebook and LinkedIn. On Facebook, you can search for 'friends who work at ____ company' or 'friends of friends who work at _____ company.' On LinkedIn, you can search for 'People who work for ____ company.' On the left side, you can narrow your search to 1st-degree connections, geographical area, and more. / / / Customize your career marketing materials (resume and cover letter) to showcase how you are the best fit for a particular place. Pay close attention to the keywords (nouns and noun phrases) in the job posting and make changes in your documents that use those keywords if they apply to your background and experience. For example, I had an IT client who had used the keyword, 'end-user training' throughout his r?sum? due to his vast experience. A company where he wanted to apply used the keyword, 'customer training.' He made the change to match their language by replacing 'end-user training' with 'customer training.' If the company uses resume-scanning software (where a computer is 'looking' for certain keywords to match candidates with job postings), then his r?sum? would have a greater chance of passing through that type of system. / / / Network online and offline. Look at your local paper for industry specific group meetings, Chamber events and more. Join industry groups on LinkedIn and Facebook to network with like-minded professionals. / / / FOLLOW-UP! Use a job search management system to remind you of when to follow-up with employers after submitting an application or resume. Check out JibberJobber.com that I talked about in episode #1 about how this tool can keep you organized in a job search. / / / There you have it ? another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today?s show notes, links, and full transcript go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/9. / / I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I?ll catch you next time! / /

May 3, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #9. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. Career Design Coach Academy airs every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 7:00 AM ET. The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you will need for a successful job search or career transition. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today’s show, head on over to www.CareerDesignCoach.com/8. I have a free, downloadable guide on Creating a Stellar LinkedIn and Twitter Profile available at www.careerdesigncoach.com/linkedin. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play.

We covered How to Develop a LinkedIn Profile that Grabs the Attention of an Employer and Recruiter in Episode #4 and last week, in Episode #5, we looked at How to Find Good Networking Connections on LinkedIn. Today, we are going to cover LinkedIn’s job board. LinkedIn has a dedicated tab on their main navigation bar to direct you to their job board called Jobs. You can select “advanced job search” to use filters such as company name or radius from a Zip code to narrow your results, just like you would on any other job board you use.

How to Use Advanced Features of LinkedIn’s Job Board

For my example, I searched for a mechanical engineer, and I returned 2,733 results. Now, always on the left side at there is a column on your desktop computer is an area to filter and drill down on results, so I would always encourage you to look over on that left column to see how you can add filters to reduce the number of results. I could add filters for zip code radius and company names if I wanted to do so. I can also look up things according to who works at companies, where I’ve got a first-degree connection, second-degree connection, third-degree connection, group connections, and more.

 

I wanted to reduce my results. I filtered within 100 miles of my Zip code, and that lowered my number to a useful 19 results. When I click on a job posting (by the way, all job postings on LinkedIn are hyperlinked), you’re going to see the job description and the ability to contact the person who posted the job. In the left-hand side of my example, you see project engineer for Georgia Pacific in Cedar Springs, Georgia, and on the right-hand side right next it to it says to contact the job poster.

How to Contact the Person Who Posts a Job

 

Now, this is unique to LinkedIn’s job board because job boards don’t contain that information on who posts the job. So that’s unique that you’re going to be able to access to the person that posted the job. On some of the job descriptions, you will click the button to apply on the company Web site. You can also view other jobs that people also viewed after seeing this one by looking in the right-hand column where it says ‘people also viewed’ giving you more positions from which you can explore.

Back to this example, though, I did click on the job poster’s name for this Georgia Pacific job, and I went to her profile page where I learned that she is a recruiter at Georgia Pacific. I clicked on the arrow by the button that says send an InMail which is LinkedIn’s direct mail platform (unfortunately, InMail is a Premium level feature, so that means you must have a paid account). You will see a drop-down menu that says view recent activity, share profile, or save the profile to a PDF. To the left side of this dropdown, you will see a blue button that says, ‘connect.’ You can send the person a connection request.

If you are on a desktop, you can personalize an invitation request. By default, the personal note says that you’d like to add them to your professional network on LinkedIn. You can delete that and customize a note to explain how you know that person and why you want to connect.

Now, just a side note, it is important to point out that on anybody’s profile page when you click on that drop-down menu you can also report or block somebody from contacting you again, or you can remove the connection altogether. So that’s where you would find it if you needed that.

Let’s go back to my example of this recruiter at Georgia Pacific. I also see in the top right-hand corner that she is a third-degree connection. So I can reverse engineer to see who I know who knows her, and then I could request an introduction since I can’t use the InMail with a free account.

Story of How I Used LinkedIn to Find a Job

When I moved to South Carolina, I used the strategy of introduction for a position with an outplacement company. A colleague of mine was connected to the job poster for the position in which I was interested. I asked for an introduction and not only did he give me one, but also highly recommended me for the job. Within a week, I had a phone interview, then a lunch interview and then I was offered the contract to the outplacement counseling for this company.

Graph Search on LinkedIn to Find Networking Contacts

LinkedIn now provides what is termed graph search. We’re going to cover this concept more in future episodes. In this example when I start typing career consultant, three result possibilities drop down: People with career consultant titles, jobs for career consultant titles, and groups about career consultants. Again, you always have filtering abilities on that left column on LinkedIn. When I selected people with career consultant titles, I returned 33,020 results, but I could filter those to my Zip code, companies where I might want to work and more. As we’ve discussed, these networking possibilities could lead to job shadowing, an informational interview, and possibly a job.

 

Next, I searched jobs for career consultants and returned 12,582 results. Again, by taking advantage of ways to filter, including filtering to show only mid to senior level jobs I was able to reduce the results.

Use Your LinkedIn Profile to Apply for a Job

Sometimes when you click on a job link, you will note instead of it saying you can apply on the company website that it will have the words, ‘Apply Now.’ What this means is that you can use your LinkedIn profile to apply for the position, and with a few clicks, you can save yourself lots of time by using your LinkedIn profile to apply for the job. Go back to Episode #4 where I took you step-by-step on how to craft your LinkedIn profile. If I click Apply, Now I will get a pop-up box. All I have to do is give permission by clicking Submit for it to use my LinkedIn profile to apply. Note that I can upload a file such as a resume and cover letter before I click Submit and I have the choice to start following this company for their updates.

 

Of course, LinkedIn has an app called LinkedIn Job Search that is available in the Apple iTunes and Google Play Stores. You will be able to access their job board on the go, too.

Following Companies on LinkedIn

So let’s look at following companies. Let’s go back to your homepage on LinkedIn, go to the search bar, and let’s type Apple in this example. In the drop-down located to the left of the search bar, select companies. Following a company page is an excellent idea and many companies report that they will check to see if a job candidate follows them on social media. On company pages, you will see announcements, including job postings. I can also see how I am connected to employees at Apple. I have three first-degree connection and 1,851-second degree connections. You notice I tend to connect a lot with I.T. people. By clicking on the ‘Careers’ tab, I can see positions for which Apple is hiring. If I want to follow Apple, I will click on the yellow Follow button located at the top-right side of the page.

 

Researching to Find Networking Connections at Target Companies

Now, if I wanted to find out some information about a prospective company where I wanted to work, or a client wants to work, I can do a general search in the search bar. In this example I typed QVC, and the dropdown gives me suggestions saying people who worked at QVC, who used to work at QVC and jobs at QVC. Let’s say I had a client who is interested in working at Microsoft. I searched people who work at Microsoft. I returned 118,263 results. Using the filtering techniques again on that left-hand column where I can just show my first-degree connections, I can power network with these individuals to get this client’s foot in the door with Microsoft.

 

The Power of Networking in Groups on LinkedIn

The next feature I wanted to show you is the power of groups. Again, go to the search bar on your homepage, and in this example I typed nurses. In the drop-down choices to the left of the search bar, I chose groups. Using no filters, I returned 845 results for groups I could join related to nursing. Always use your filtering to narrow the results. I had an outplacement client I used to work with who used groups in his local area and uncovered in person networking meet up groups. In one meeting he met the H.R. director of his dream company and connected with her. He emailed his resume the next day and ended up eventually working at the company of his dreams.

One way I filtered was to search nurses in Washington, and that narrowed the group to seven. So look at groups for your industry, your passions. There are all kinds of groups out there. Just type in some keywords that interest you. You might type in “rehabilitation counselors for people who are deaf and hard of hearing” and find a group that’s accurate for that niche. So just play around with it. Join groups. I believe you can join up to 50 groups on LinkedIn, and it’s a great way to network with like-minded professionals and get your foot in the door to get answers about questions. Also, in these groups, you will see job postings sometimes that they will post for different industries. Posting job announcements in groups on LinkedIn doesn’t cost anything, so remember that that is a free strategy for employers, and recruiters as LinkedIn’s job board does charge them to post.

There you have it – another episode of Career Design Coach Academy. For today’s show notes, links, and full transcript go to www.careerdesigncoach.com/8. Remember to grab your free, downloadable guide on Creating a Stellar LinkedIn and Twitter Profile available at www.careerdesigncoach.com/linkedin.

I love hearing from you! Do me a favor and share this podcast with one person who you know will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show, and I’ll catch you next time!

Apr 28, 2016

This is Career Design Coach Academy with Kristen Jacoway Beasley, Episode #7. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for tuning in. I’m launching a three-episode-per-week format starting this week. On Tuesdays, I am conducting interviews with career experts or I’m having mini-trainings on different job search tools. On Wednesdays, I’ll answer an audience question, and on Thursdays, I will give you a tip, tool, or app recommendation to help you in your job search or career transition.

The goal of Career Design Coach Academy is to inspire and educate you on the different strategies you will need for a successful job search or career transition. For additional resources, show notes, links, and a full transcript of today’s show, head on over to www.CareerDesignCoach.com/7. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play.

This week’s recommendation is called The Freedom Journal and I have it in my hands right now. This is a hardcover book and it’s leather bound with gold leaf pages. You can get a copy at TheFreedomJournal.com. It is by John Lee Dumas and it’s something to help you accomplish your goals in 100 days. The reason I love this is because sometimes I can let my day get dictated by the e-mails that I’m getting or by the phone calls that I’m receiving, but this really helps me get that clarity and focus that I need in order to reach my goals.

I had planned to launch Career Design Coach Academy back in January. In October, I had a really bad car accident where this little deer – well, big deer I should say, it was pretty big – it crossed the interstate, really tore up the front end of my car because I hit it head on at 70 miles per hour, and I had a shoulder and a neck injury. I had to go physical therapy for a couple of months in order to recover fully from that experience and it put everything on the back burner for me. I found that I was just going through the motions of life like we all seem to get caught up doing from time to time.

So when I got The Freedom Journal, I just loved it because it helped me develop those S.M.A.R.T goals which means specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound. What you’re doing is setting a goal and every day you’re rewriting that goal. What is it that you want to achieve in 100 days or less?

My goal, of course, was I set a new podcast launch day of April 5th because that was the 8th anniversary of my company, and so I thought that would be a great time to do it. It gave me plenty of time to develop all the content that I needed in order to batch record some of these shows so that they would release on certain dates and I would be ahead of the game.

The thing that I loved about it is that every single day in the morning I write down what I’m grateful for, and that really helps me to get centered for my day. Then I write about what is my focus? What are the action steps that are going to get me there? Then at night, I take The Freedom Journal and I write about what worked that day and what I struggled with that day.

What I found over the course of doing this is, a lot of times what I struggled with was I put too much down to accomplish in a day. It helped me to go back and review and see why I wasn’t able to do everything that I had set out to do and then it also helped me to focus better for the next day.

Again, this is a great book. It helped me get my podcast launched and off the ground. John Lee Dumas, again, is the author of this book. You can pick it up at TheFreedomJournal.com. You can also catch John Lee Dumas’ podcast called EOFire which means Entrepreneurs on Fire. He interviews an entrepreneur who’s been very successful seven days a week, so you will always have new content every single day.

I thank you so much for listening to Career Design Coach Academy. If you want today’s show notes and transcripts, please head on over to CareerDesignCoach.com/7. Just remember, I love hearing from you. Do me a favor and share this podcast with one person who you will benefit from it. Thank you so much for tuning into the show and I’ll catch you next time.

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Apr 27, 2016

Introduction/Summary

Is your first question at a job interview, "Uh...where's the snack room?" The right questions can be a tool for success. In Episode 6, I will show you how to ask questions that will help you look like the company's best answer.

 

Good questions depend on good research. You should find out as much as possible about the company before the interview because that shows you're interested in working for them. In Episode 1, you can learn about 3 effective research tools.

 

The questions you ask should be open-ended and tailored to the company. They should be designed to help you find out if you're a good fit for the company and what it's like to work there. You can ask about things you've read about the company on their website or social media, or in the news.

 

This is a good opportunity to find out what your duties and what the company's expectations of you would be. You can also ask about chances for advancement and what additional training is available.

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